Thursday, November 1, 2012


Hurricane Sandy came in with a few punches over the weekend. I am lucky to live in Brooklyn where I have been relatively unaffected by the sweeping power outages and physical effects of the storm. As news has been developing days after, my heart definitely goes out to those who have lost their lives, their homes, and are still losing their jobs to indefinite shut downs because of storm damage. As of Thursday, the MTA subways are running a sizable amount of their lines, but all trains running in lower Manhattan are pretty much still out. In this one aspect I can't complain workwise, my trains have disabled me from getting to work and I am definitely not skating to work. Williamsburg has also felt like a weeklong happy hour since Saturday evening. Aside from the consistent sounds of sirens filling the air, and the occassional fallen lamp post, everything seems pretty normal where I am. I've been noticing the only way to get people to Brooklyn from Manhattan is when power is out on the island. This is literally the only reason why some of these I-never-go-to-Brooklyn types appear here. That and they need to charge their iphones and look for food. It's kind of strange seeing the news show people dumpster diving in Nolita, interviewing people who are saying they are eating perishables because they can't find working ATMS. Are these people retarded? Walk over the bridge which will take you fifteen minutes and find an ATM. I guess there are some people that really refuse to go to Brooklyn for anything. 



The storm has raised a lot of questions from Bloomberg's questionable Emergency Spanish announcements to the unsettling pattern of severe storms in the North East. I remember when Hurricane Irene happened last year and people were losing their minds. Then she came and the next day it was actually sunny and that was confusing. There is no question that Hurricane Sandy will prove to be a costly hurricane based on insurance claims, government losses, and economic loss in general. You can already see the staggering post storm effects. Strangely, I had not even heard about Hurricane Sandy until two days before. Maybe this was a mix of traveling the past six weeks to countries with 90 degree heat and also not watching TV at all. The extent of my storm preparation was buying three gallons of water. If worse came to worse, I would buy an extra large pizza and eat that for a week. This is what Irene taught me. Sandy estimated at landfall, would be a category 1 storm.

It is hard to imagine that a category 1 storm is capable of flooding entire blocks of Manhattan. And not just flooding like your ankles are wet, but flooding like 6 feet of water stalking and killing you type of flood water. While several friends partied through the night and traveled through heavy 80+ mph winds, I opted to languish inside with my battery powered radio and Full House dvds. The idea that the hurricane itself would kill me was not my concern. My bigger concern was experiencing a final destination type death where someone's unseen air conditioner they still haven't removed from summer yet gets yanked out of it's window, finds me in the street, and kills me. You could also apply this scenario to any object capable of being lifted into the air. A set of forgotten steak knives in someones backyard? A dangling power line that aims right into my eyeball and I die a Darwinian death on the streets of Brooklyn while my head explodes. Paranoid? Not at all. Shit gets real out here.

Another thing I've been thinking about is this election coming up. The idea that there's all this "divide" about what the government should and shouldn't be involved in when it comes to individuals and states.   So what about natural disasters? When it comes to natural disasters you need all the money you can get to rebuild your infrastructure. Do people expect private companies to come in and rebuild roads and bridges when the state is "broke"? The fact that New York City was crippled by a category 1 storm has definitely raised questions about how to move forward in the city's preparation for the future. Although it has been said by Bloomberg himself that this 108 year old subway system was not designed to handle such a severe storm. It then poses the question that we should start updating this antiquated subway system because it's not getting any younger and the storms don't seem to be getting weaker. When the next big hurricane comes around it will be like a 110 year old subway system that the mayor is forgetting to retire, or at least give a hip replacement to.

In addition to a federal and state tax, I also pay a New York City tax. Instead of paying police to harass 17 year olds in the street with empty backpacks, please use my tax money to pay people to update the damn subway system. And I don't know, maybe someone should think to make it illegal to park your skyscraping crane in midtown before a powerful storm. Give that crane a million dollar parking ticket and we can use that money for Hurricane relief. Another thought. If New York City ever witnesses anything above a category 1 we may all be fucked. Just some thoughts.

If you are curious where your city tax dollars go, and how much of it goes where, visit this site:

http://mbpo.org/taxreceipt/




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